Student Dress Codes And The First Amendment

Author: Richard Fossey
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1475802056
Size: 24.64 MB
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Students’ early morning decisions about what to wear to school have led many school districts into legal issues and policy challenges. Confederate belt buckles, exposed bellies, sagging pants, political statements, and social commentary have all been banned from schools, and these bans have often resulted in litigation by students who claim their constitutional right to free speech has been violated. Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment: Legal Challenges and Policy Issues explores the legal issues that arise when a school prohibits various types of student attire. Through an analysis of major Supreme and federal court cases, this volume examines conflicts that arise when administrators juggle a student’s right to free speech with the need to maintain an environment conducive to learning.

The First Amendment In Schools

Author: Charles C. Haynes
Publisher: ASCD
ISBN: 087120777X
Size: 67.13 MB
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Provides educators with answers to ninety questions on the First Amendment, covering such issues as school prayer, holidays, student groups, censorship, speech, dress codes, and the Internet.

Student Dress Codes In The 1990s

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ISBN:
Size: 28.96 MB
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Features the full text of an article entitled "Student Dress Codes in the 1990s," by Ann L. Majestic and Tharrington Smith. Discusses hair length regulations, dress regulations, first amendment issues, case law related to student dress codes, gang-related clothes and insignias, and uniforms in public schools.

The Challenges Of Mandating School Uniforms In The Public Schools

Author: Todd A. DeMitchell
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1475809352
Size: 20.57 MB
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School uniform polices, often associated with private schools, are increasingly being adopted in public schools; but not without controversy. The often asserted reasons for mandating uniforms include improved student behavior, better attendance, less competition over clothing, and improved student learning because students would not be distracted by who was wearing what and could focus on their studies. Wishful thinking or empirically tested hypotheses? However, opponents assert that a mandated uniform seeks to homogenize the students, violates their free speech rights, and does not solve the problems the policy is intended to remedy. The Challenges of Mandating School Uniforms in the Public Schools: Free Speech, Research, and Policy explores the policy rationale, the constitutional rights of students, and the research on the impact of school uniforms. Educators, parents, and policymakers will find this book and its companion, Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment: Legal Challenges and Policy Issues, a must read when considering student attire issues.

The Oldest Rule

Author: Christopher B. Gilbert
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1503523500
Size: 54.35 MB
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This book could save you $1 million! OK, maybe not – but some school districts have spent that much defending themselves (and not always successfully) in First Amendment lawsuits brought by students and their parents. First Amendment litigation is on the rise across the nation, and as any principal who has sat through a deposition in one of those cases can tell you, the raw emotions and zealous anger that fuels such disputes can become a massive distraction from your real job of running a school. The Oldest Rule is a comprehensive examination of the different First Amendment issues involving students that public school administrators and attorneys are increasingly facing on daily basis. We will look at such topics as school prayer, dress codes, student threats and cyberbullying, the distribution of literature, the use of public facilities by outside groups, the celebration of religious holidays, and the rise of esoteric religions and their impact in the public schools. Written by Chris Gilbert, an attorney with over twenty-one years’ experience advising and representing school districts – big and small, urban and rural -- this book combines discussions of the legal standards and key case decisions with practical advice and hypotheticals.

Let The Students Speak

Author: David L. Hudson
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 080704458X
Size: 36.23 MB
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From a trusted scholar and powerful story teller, an accessible and lively history of free speech, for and about students. Let the Students Speak! details the rich history and growth of the First Amendment in public schools, from the early nineteenth-century's failed student free-expression claims to the development of protection for students by the U.S. Supreme Court. David Hudson brings this history vividly alive by drawing from interviews with key student litigants in famous cases, including John Tinker of Tinker v. Des Moines Independent School District and Joe Frederick of the "Bong Hits 4 Jesus" case, Morse v. Frederick. He goes on to discuss the raging free-speech controversies in public schools today, including dress codes and uniforms, cyberbullying, and the regulation of any violent-themed expression in a post-Columbine and Virginia Tech environment. This book should be required reading for students, teachers, and school administrators alike. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Dressing Constitutionally

Author: Ruthann Robson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521761654
Size: 34.50 MB
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This book examines the rights to expression and equality, and the restraints on government power, as they both limit and allow control of our personal choices.

Free Speech Beyond Words

Author: Mark V. Tushnet
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479880280
Size: 68.95 MB
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The Supreme Court has unanimously held that Jackson Pollock’s paintings, Arnold Schöenberg’s music, and Lewis Carroll’s poem “Jabberwocky” are “unquestionably shielded” by the First Amendment. Nonrepresentational art, instrumental music, and nonsense: all receive constitutional coverage under an amendment protecting “the freedom of speech,” even though none involves what we typically think of as speech—the use of words to convey meaning. As a legal matter, the Court’s conclusion is clearly correct, but its premises are murky, and they raise difficult questions about the possibilities and limitations of law and expression. Nonrepresentational art, instrumental music, and nonsense do not employ language in any traditional sense, and sometimes do not even involve the transmission of articulable ideas. How, then, can they be treated as “speech” for constitutional purposes? What does the difficulty of that question suggest for First Amendment law and theory? And can law resolve such inquiries without relying on aesthetics, ethics, and philosophy? Comprehensive and compelling, this book represents a sustained effort to account, constitutionally, for these modes of “speech.” While it is firmly centered in debates about First Amendment issues, it addresses them in a novel way, using subject matter that is uniquely well suited to the task, and whose constitutional salience has been under-explored. Drawing on existing legal doctrine, aesthetics, and analytical philosophy, three celebrated law scholars show us how and why speech beyond words should be fundamental to our understanding of the First Amendment.

Lessons In Censorship

Author: Catherine J. Ross
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674915771
Size: 63.26 MB
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American public schools censor controversial student speech that the Constitution protects. Catherine Ross brings clarity to court rulings that define speech rights of young citizens and proposes ways to protect free expression, arguing that the failure of schools to respect civil liberties betrays their educational mission and threatens democracy.