Enduring Acequias

Author: Juan Estevan Arellano
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826355080
Size: 17.18 MB
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For generations the Río Embudo watershed in northern New Mexico has been the home of Juan Estevan Arellano and his ancestors. From this unique perspective Arellano explores the ways people use water in dry places around the world. Touching on the Middle East, Europe, Mexico, and South America before circling back to New Mexico, Arellano makes a case for preserving the acequia irrigation system and calls for a future that respects the ecological limitations of the land.

Acequia Culture

Author: José A. Rivera
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826327206
Size: 61.60 MB
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Conflicts between Hispanic farmers and developers made for compelling reading in The Milagro Beanfield War, the famous novel of life in a northern New Mexico village in which tradition triumphs over modernity. But as cities grow and industries expand, are acequias, or community irrigation ditches, a wise and efficient use of water in the arid Southwest? José Rivera presents the contemporary case for the value of acequias and the communities they nurture in the river valleys of southern Colorado and New Mexico. Recognizing that "water is the lifeblood of the community," Rivera delineates an acequia culture based on a reciprocal relationship between irrigation and community. The acequia experience grows out of a conservation ethic and a tradition of sharing that should be recognized and preserved in an age of increasing competition for scarce water resources. "A worthwhile contribution to the future management of water resources."--Professor Michael C. Meyer

Acequia

Author: Sylvia Rodríguez
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 9781930618558
Size: 23.75 MB
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Every society must have a system for capturing, storing, and distributing water, a system encompassing both technology and a rationale for the division of this finite resource. Today, people around the world face severe and growing water scarcity, and every-where this vital resource is ceasing to be a right and becoming a commodity. The acequia or irrigation ditch associations of Taos, Rio Arriba, Mora, and other northern New Mexico counties offer an alternative. Few northern New Mexicans farm for a living anymore, but many still gather to clean the ditches each spring and irrigate fields and gardens with the water that runs through them. Increasingly, ditch associations also go to court to defend their water rights against the competing claims brought by population growth, urbanization, and industrial or resort development. Their insistence on the traditional sharing of waters offers a solution to the current worldwide water crisis.

Thinking Like A Watershed

Author: Jack Loeffler
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826352340
Size: 28.41 MB
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Thinking Like a Watershed points our understanding of our relationship to the land in new directions. It is shaped by the bioregional visions of the great explorer John Wesley Powell, who articulated the notion that the arid American West should be seen as a mosaic of watersheds, and the pioneering ecologist Aldo Leopold, who put forward the concept of bringing conscience to bear within the realm of “the land ethic.” Produced in conjunction with the documentary radio series entitled Watersheds as Commons, this book comprises essays and interviews from a diverse group of southwesterners including members of Tewa, Tohono O’odham, Hopi, Navajo, Hispano, and Anglo cultures. Their varied cultural perspectives are shaped by consciousness and resilience through having successfully endured the aridity and harshness of southwestern environments over time.

Chicano Culture Ecology Politics

Author: Devon Gerardo Peña
Publisher: Univ of Arizona Pr
ISBN:
Size: 73.68 MB
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Until recently, mainstream American environmentalism has been a predominantly white, middle-class movement, essentially ignoring the class, race, and gender dimensions of environmental politics. In this provocative collection of original essays, the environmental dimensions of the Chicana/o experience are explicitly expressed and debated. Employing a variety of genres ranging from poetry to autobiography to theoretical and empirical essays, the voices in this collection speak to the most significant issues of environmentalism and social justice, recognizing throughout the need for a pluralism of Chicana/o philosophies. The contributors provide an excellent basis for understanding how multiple Chicana/o views on the environment play out in the context of dominant social, political and economic views. "Chicano Culture, Ecology, Politics" examines a number of Chicana/o ecological perspectives. How can the ethics of reciprocity present in Chicana/o agropastoral life be protected and applied on a broader scale? How can the dominant society, whose economic structure is invested in "placeless mobility," take note of the harm caused to land-based cultures, take responsibility for it, and take heed before it is too late? Will the larger society be "ecologically housebroken" before it destroys its home? Grounded in actual political struggles waged by Chicana/o communities over issues of environmental destruction, cultural genocide, and socioeconomic domination, this volume provides an important series of snapshots of Chicana/o history. "Chicano Culture, Ecology, Politics" illuminates the bridges that exist--and must be understood--between race, ethnicity, class, gender, politics, and ecology.CONTENTS Part 1: IndoHispano Land Ethics Los Animalitos: Culture, Ecology, and the Politics of Place in the Upper RAo Grande, Devon G. PeAa Social Action Research, Bioregionalism, and the Upper RA-o Grande, RubA(c)n O. MartA-nez Notes on (Home)Land Ethics: Ideas, Values, and the Land, Reyes GarcA-a Part 2: Environmental History and Ecological Politics Ecological Legitimacy and Cultural Essentialism: Hispano Grazing in Northern New Mexico, Laura Pulido The Capitalist Tool, the Lawless, and the Violent: A Critique of Recent Southwestern Environmental History, Devon G. PeAa and RubA(c)n O. MartA-nez Ecofeminism and Chicano Environmental Struggles: Bridges across Gender and Race, Gwyn Kirk Philosophy Meets Practice: A Critique of Ecofeminism through the Voices of Three Chicana Activists, Malia Davis Part 3: Alternatives to Destruction The Pasture Poacher (a poem), Joseph C. Gallegos Acequia Tales: Stories from a Chicano Centennial Farm, Joseph C. Gallegos A Gold Mine, an Orchard, and an Eleventh Commandment, Devon G. PeAa

A Tortilla Is Like Life

Author: Carole M. Counihan
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292782446
Size: 61.28 MB
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Located in the southern San Luis Valley of Colorado, the remote and relatively unknown town of Antonito is home to an overwhelmingly Hispanic population struggling not only to exist in an economically depressed and politically marginalized area, but also to preserve their culture and their lifeways. Between 1996 and 2006, anthropologist Carole Counihan collected food-centered life histories from nineteen Mexicanas—Hispanic American women—who had long-standing roots in the Upper Rio Grande region. The interviews in this groundbreaking study focused on southern Colorado Hispanic foodways—beliefs and behaviors surrounding food production, distribution, preparation, and consumption. In this book, Counihan features extensive excerpts from these interviews to give voice to the women of Antonito and highlight their perspectives. Three lines of inquiry are framed: feminist ethnography, Latino cultural citizenship, and Chicano environmentalism. Counihan documents how Antonito's Mexicanas establish a sense of place and belonging through their knowledge of land and water and use this knowledge to sustain their families and communities. Women play an important role by gardening, canning, and drying vegetables; earning money to buy food; cooking; and feeding family, friends, and neighbors on ordinary and festive occasions. They use food to solder or break relationships and to express contrasting feelings of harmony and generosity, or enmity and envy. The interviews in this book reveal that these Mexicanas are resourceful providers whose food work contributes to cultural survival.

Chicanas And Chicanos In Contemporary Society

Author: Roberto Moreno De Anda
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742519343
Size: 58.11 MB
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This book deals with a broad range of social issues facing Mexican-origin people in the United States. The studies presented in this volume are brought together by two main themes: (1) social inequalities-cultural, educational, and economic-endured by the Chicano/Mexicano community in the United States and (2) the community's efforts to eradicate the source of those inequalities. The second edition of Chicanas and Chicanos in Contemporary Society takes into consideration the most recent demographic changes affecting the Chicano/Mexicano people. With one-third of persons of Mexican descent under the age of fifteen, many of the challenges center on the current well-being of children and their future prospects. Unlike any other book in the market, several chapters closely examine issues related to children and youth, with particular attention given to children's ethnic identity, schooling practices, and educational policies. Two additional features set this book apart from other books. First, it includes new chapters focused on Chicana/Mexicana mothers, including adolescent mothers, interactions with their children and their efforts to reform schools. Second, it has contributions that analyze relations between Mexican immigrants and their coethnics born in the United States. The studies offered in this volume employ multiple theoretical perspectives and research methods. The studies invoke theories from social science disciplines such as sociology, anthropology, and psychology. Contributors use a variety of analytical strategies, including ethnographic methods and quantitative analysis.

The Pastoral Clinic

Author: Angela Garcia
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520258290
Size: 61.81 MB
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"Timely, disturbing, and luminously written, The Pastoral Clinic is anthropology at its best, bringing into view a devastating piece of reality, highlighting larger processes and human singularities, and calling for a new public and ethics of care."—João Biehl, author of Vita: Life in a Zone of Social Abandonment "Garcia calls for a new ethics of care for heroin addicts, exposing the insufficiency and lack of continuity of rapidly privatizing faith-based services for the rural poor. Her heartfelt ethnography of the geography of addiction in New Mexico reveals how formerly agricultural communities and families find themselves painfully embedded in a land of dispossession and displacement with an unresolvable past, and an unlivable present."—Philippe Bourgois, author of Righteous Dopefiend "Angela Garcia has expanded the roots and basis of addictions to the great losses—personal, cultural, economic, of birthright and land—that few would dare to explore. I've sought a book like this for years, addressing my own addictions and those of the young men and women I've worked with for decades. A formidable thinker, a wrench-in-the-works activist inside and out of the industry, Angela understands that addictions are not a 'always has been and always will be' fate, but a collective, individual, and even 'intimate,' funneling into the web. And how the path toward healing, reconciliation, and wholeness is in the land, in the hand, and the capable heart of every addict and broken community."—Luis J. Rodriguez, author of Always Running: La Vida Loca, Gang Days in LA